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Old 11-16-2014, 01:47 AM   #1
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Warning about Ford Focus as Towed

My wife and I traded in our Prius C for a 2014 Ford Focus Hatchback with its innovative 6 speed transmission that allows 4-wheels down towing at 65 MPH with no restrictions such as requiring a stop to run the engine or a special pump to circulate oil.
For many reasons we like our 2014 Ford Focus, but I'd have to warn people about the transmission's strange behavior. If you do a Google search with the phrase "For Focus" and the terms "automatic,""transmission," "trouble," and "problems"
you will turn up a long list of results such as:
Investigation finds hundreds of complaints about Ford transmissions | Investigations - WTAE Home
which provides a summary of the strange and some say dangerous behaviors of the transmission.
I've started this thread just to help inform individuals who are considering different toweds.
John
Athen, GA
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Old 11-16-2014, 10:26 AM   #2
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So if I recall, you indicated that the transmission resets itself after dinghy towing to factory defaults?

Or is there more to it?

If so, one thing I might consider is to not disconnect the battery each time you tow it. Rather, you may wish to "experiment" with a toad charger - a charger that is connected to the toad's battery and kept charged by the coach.

The existing toad chargers are fairly simplistic, and may or mat not provide enough current to keep the toad's battery charged if it has a significant load on it - it would have to be something to look at.
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Old 11-16-2014, 10:36 AM   #3
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FW28z,

The Ford Focus towing instructions say that you must disconnect the battery for recreational towing, so I'd be afraid to try to tow it with the battery connected UNLESS someone on this forum has done so successfully. Who knows, maybe all Ford was worried about was having the battery run down! If so, then a solar charger and/or a towed charger would be the ticket, as I feel certain that the battery disconnection is part of the cause of our transmission's strange behavior--as it goes back into "learning mode" with each re-connection.
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Old 11-16-2014, 10:53 AM   #4
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I know that the Ford documentation says to disconnect the battery. I am sure they do that because of the battery's risk of running down.

The only issue I could see is if you had to keep the key in the RUN position - in older cars, that could burn out part of the ignition system. But I am guessing you keep the engine in the ACC position, which should not mess with the ignition.

I sold my wonderful Nissan Maxima as it had a CVT that could not be dinghy towed and bought a 2014 Taurus as it could be towed.

Funny thing though. For my Taurus, you are supposed to keep the ignition in the ACC position when towing, and there is no requirement to disconnect the battery. Don't you love it when there is no consistency by a manufacturer.

At any rate, after doing some research, the couple of other people I found towing the Taurus recommended to turn the ignition switch so that it goes just past the ACC position, and does not go into the OFF position. It is between positions. In their explanation, it keeps the battery from running down.

Now I suppose that hitting a pothole with the car could "jiggle" the ignition switch into either the OFF or ACC position, so that might be a risk. But with at least the Ford vehicles, there is no steering wheel lock in the OFF position, so you are safe there.

Whether that might work for the Focus or not, who knows? Do you have a clamp DC ammeter? You could monitor the current drain if you were a bit prone to experimentation. But I do realize that on a new car, you will want to limit such experiments. At least I would want to limit what I did.

I have to imagine though that there are a lot more people towing a Focus than a Taurus, so perhaps you just need to monitor the internet until you find what others did to improve things.

Even though we bought the Taurus to tow, my mom bought a Focus soon after (I think my buying a new car prompted her to buy one too). So, I bought her old 2002 Pontiac Grand Am, which has a Saturn transmission, and is towable.

As it turned out, I should have kept the Maxima and bought the Grand Am. But that is how things turn out I suppose.

So rather than towing the Taurus, I am towing the Grand Am as it is 1,000lbs lighter and since it is fully depreciated so I am not as hesitant to try different things, drill holes in the frame for the baseplate, etc.

According to GM, when recreational towing, I am supposed to remove three fuses, as I need to keep the ignition in ACC when towing - as on that car, the steering wheel will lock.

Or more precisely, you cannot cannot go from ACC to OFF with the transmission not in Park. And as long as the transmission is not in Park, the steering wheel is not locked.

But even with the three fuses (that GM specifies) is pulled, the car still has power - as the brake lights still work, as well as the stereo. The three fuses are for the windshield wipers (strange), as well as two of them marked PCM something or other (most likely for the engine computer).

At any rate, when I replace the fuses after towing and start the car, about 50% of the time, with the engine running, the engine fan starts and remains running. The fan won't shut off until I turn the ignition off, then restart. At that point - the fan runs normally.

So there is a lot of strange, voodoo techniques to towing, I think.
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Old 11-16-2014, 12:41 PM   #5
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A few observations (which may or may not be related):
The new Focus (which started with the 2012 model year) has a dual-clutch "automatic manual" transmission (basically a computer controlled manual transmission). As such many people complaining about it simply didn't like how it felt as it does drive just like a manual (the engine lags as the clutch engages from a stop, shifts are a little clunky, etc.). (I liked the way it felt when we had our 2012--my wife didn't..we never towed it however.)
Ford spent a lot of time and many TSBs reprogramming the car to make the shifts smoother (and one specifically to prevent roll-back on a hill) but still people didn't like it. Its the nature of the beast--it doesn't feel like an automatic, it feels like a manual.

In addition, unfortunately for me, the fully electric Focus (BEV) cannot be towed at all--the only way to tow it is four wheels off the ground .
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Old 11-16-2014, 02:53 PM   #6
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Yea, that sucks. But you can still dolly tow the electric Focus. With the lighter weight of the Focus, adding the dolly still means you are probably only around 3,500lbs.

I kind of struggled a bit with buying a dolly (and keeping our Maxima) or buying a different car to dinghy tow.

Really, there are advantages and disadvantages to both.

Dinghy towing to me seems a bit Rube Goldberg. You got to do some voodoo transmission rituals with some vehicles (check out the procedure for the CR-V), and then, you need to put in some kind of brake system (or at least should), then have a battery issue to contend with, and so on.

And of course, towing this way means you should service your transmission more often as well as more wear and tear on at least the front end.

In contrast, dolly towing is much more simple, but you have a lot of un-sprung weight on the front, which might result in a harsher ride when towing.

Some also point out it's harder to attach a vehicle to a dolly, as well as having a place to store it. I really did not think that much of an issue though.

What it really came down to for us was gas station accessibility. This year, we used our RV without towing - at least until late Sept. when we got the Pontiac outfitted.

Of the times we had to fill up at a gas station, two times I had to back out from the pumps. I would not be able to do that with a tow vehicle attached - dinghy or dolly - so the ability to more quickly detach the tow vehicle when at the pump is what ultimately made us go with dinghy towing.

Otherwise, dingy vs. dolly towing is not much different in my view.
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Old 11-16-2014, 03:42 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FW28z
Yea, that sucks. But you can still dolly tow the electric Focus. With the lighter weight of the Focus, adding the dolly still means you are probably only around 3,500lbs.
Nope cannot dolly tow electric Focus has to be 4 up on a trailer. Says so specifically in the owners manual under "recreational towing". I can't think of a reason mechanically as the rear wheels are free spinning. I speculate that it has to do with the weight and position of the battery--specifically the upper one. There must be something about raising the front wheels up causing some bad geometry.

In addition, the electric Focus is 3620 lbs all by itself (yeah took it to a scale LOL).

So far our solution has been Hertz: Just rent a car at the location in question.
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Old 11-16-2014, 05:58 PM   #8
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I was surprised you cannot dolly tow it. That double-sucks.

I do know that some sports cars cannot be dolly towed, but it is due to clearance issues with the pavement as they are pretty low to the ground. Perhaps that is the issue with the Focus.

But I saw a Miata dolly towed backwards on a motorhome once (it is a RWD). I guess they weren't too worried about ground clearance.

Man, I am surprised by the weight. I suppose all those batteries do weigh a bit.

Before we decided on a toad, we also thought of the rental car approach. In fact, we might still use that option in certain circumstances. I can see that we may not always take the toad with us.

For example, if we are going to Florida for a month, especially if we stay in one location then yea, we will take the toad.

But if we are on the go, day after day to a different location - which is one area a motorhome has an advantage - then we may forego the toad, and if we get into a situation whereby we need a car - we can always rent one... maybe.

We wanted to visit a place last summer about 25 miles from the campground, and went to try and rent a car. Unfortunately, we were in a fairly small town, and the car rental place was closed on weekends.

Who has an auto rental operation closed on Saturdays?

But with enough planning, we could have rented on a Friday I suppose - but our desire to rent a vehicle more or less was a last minute thing on a Saturday.

Also, before opting on a toad, we looked at bikes - everything from a scooter to a CanAm type. I was highly interested in a CanAm, but then saw the $20K+ price tag for a new one (you can get a used one a lot cheaper though).
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Old 11-16-2014, 06:19 PM   #9
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This is a good thread for me as I am learning a lot. Regarding our 2014 FF, it has the clutch chatter problem on a slow take off, unpredictable gear selection at times, and sudden acceleration from a stop if you touch the gas pedal a little more than normal in order to avoid the shudder/chatter problem. Ford says the tranny checks out fine. I say WTF (sorry) this thing isn't working very well.
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Old 11-16-2014, 06:21 PM   #10
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Also, there is a Youtube video that shows how to fix the clutch problem. Basically it involves installing new, tougher seals, and re-programming the "smart" clutches.
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Old 11-16-2014, 06:26 PM   #11
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Have you looked around the Focus Fanatics forums?
Ford Focus Forum, Focus ST Forum
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Old 11-16-2014, 11:43 PM   #12
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Do you think your transmission issues are related to it's being towed, or just the nature of the weird transmission?
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Old 11-18-2014, 01:41 PM   #13
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I am now surprised to be reading this since I purchased a 2014 Focus to tow with four wheels down. Everything I read indicated the Focus with automatic could be towed this way. What issues are created during a relearn after hooking the battery back up? Being a GM guy the only thing I noticed about the Focus was the shifting was different than my GM's. I wanted a Chevy Cruze however they could not be towed with four wheels on the ground. After looking at my owners manual again it states to turn the ignition off after confirming the transmission is ready when it was put in neutral. If the ignition is off I am not sure why it is necessary to unhook the negative battery terminal. I'll check with the local Ford dealer. My Focus only had 6 miles on it when I picked it up and it shifted different but fine, no problems. Actually I like the performance of the car for local driving. I am trying to decide which tow bar I want to purchase. I haven't decided that yet and the different braking systems available seem kind of strange and expensive.
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Old 11-18-2014, 03:06 PM   #14
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I bought a 2014 Taurus as a toad last summer. But then my mom liked the smell of our new car, so she bought a 2014 Focus. Then I bought her 2002 Pontiac Grand Am (37,000 miles) and since it was fully depreciated, I decided to use that for my toad.

At some point though, I'll likely buy her Focus when she goes for her next new car, so I see myself as a future Focus tow'er.

Honestly, though. I wish I would have looked at the Focus when we got the Taurus. But I am tall (6'2"), so I completely discounted the Focus. But when I went car shopping with my mom, I test drove a Focus, and I was really impressed with the interior leg room and head room for a tall guy like myself.

If I had to do it over again, I'd have bought the Focus and stayed with one vehicle (we're retired so we don't need a parking lot full of cars).

The Taurus is a nice car to be sure, but it weighs over 4,000lbs, which is still towable with my RV. However, it was too new and too expensive for me to start drilling holes in the fascia (as well, the fascia looks ugly after modification for a towbar).

Pages 201~203 of your owner's manual (at least for the 2014 Focus) has the procedure for towing. On page 202 and 203, is where it indicates to disconnect the negative lead of the battery (step 5).



Each vehicle has a different procedure - even those from the same manufacturer. One of the most complex is the CR-V. But for my Pontiac (uses the same transmission as most Saturns), I have to remove 3 fuses.

The two most popular towbar brands are made by BlueOx and Roadmaster. I went with BlueOx for my Pontiac as the baseplate was an easier install (I did it myself). Typically, one or the other baseplate will look better on any particular car (that is, the stuff sticking out of the front fascia), so that might influence your decision.

Normally, you would buy the same brand towbar as the baseplate. However, most of the manufacturers make adapters or even towbars for their competitor's baseplates.

For towbars, they cost anywhere from $100 to almost $1,000 and to the new shopper, they can be a bit confusing.

Basically there are two types; vehicle mounted (the towbar stays on the vehicle when disconnected) and motorhome mounted (the towbar stays on the motorhome).

Withing these two types, there are two "sub-types"; those with adjustable arms, and those with fixed arms.

The least expensive (and hardest to use) towbars are the vehicle mounted fixed arm type, but unless price is your overall goal, many people find them to be hard to use.

The main issue is aligning the vehicle with the motorhome to get the towbar to fit.

With a fixed arm towbar, you must position the toad (towed vehicle) exactly so that the towbar fits onto the motorhomes's ball hitch/receiver. With an adjustable arm towbar, you just need to get close, and then the arms will extend or retract to allow you a range of connecting the towbar to the motorhome's ball hitch/receiver.

Then with the adjustable towbar, when you initially pull forward, the arms will extend and lock into place.

If you go with a vehicle mounted towbar, it will usually have the traditional ball coupler, and you "store" the towbar on the vehicle when not in use (of course, you can always remove it). Some towbars are collapsible to make this easier, but the cheapest ones just stick up in the air. I have seen RV'ers simply use a bungee cord or two to keep it raised when driving around.

Motorhome mounted towbars simply stay attached to the motorhome.

One other issue is the fixed arm and vehicle mounted towbars can only fit certain widths of baseplates. If you ever think you might change out toads at some point, you may end up having to buy another towbar if the one you have will not fit your new car. The motorhome mounted towbars will fit virtually all baseplates.

For that reason, I bought a BlueOx Alpha (motorhome mounted adjustable) towbar.

For brakes, there are a couple of schools of thought. Most states allow up to 3,000lbs of towed weight before brakes are required. But some states are only 1,500lbs. However, most towing vehicles require brakes for towing anything more than 1,000lbs.

If you go with a brake system, it will be the most expensive part of the tow package. There are a couple of types; installed and portable. Installed brake systems can be of the surge brake style (cable attaches from the surge brake type coupler to brake pedal), externally air powered (if you have a diesel pusher), or installed as a unit.

Installing a system of course limits you if you change vehicles, and usually taps into the vehicle's brake/vacuum system (which I did not like).

The portable systems are either electrical or air ram powered, and operate by an accelerometer.

Costs of the installed systems are less initially, but if you pay for them to be installed, can rival the cost of the portable ones. And the installation can be fairly complex.

I have the RViBrake2 portable system, and to be honest, it only brakes under moderate conditions. For example, if I come to a stop slowly, and just feather the RV's brakes lightly, the portable braking system won't kick in. However, when I step on the brakes enough that I can feel my chest going forward, that is usually enough for the brakes to engage. And that is on the most sensitive position.

One other thing you will need to consider is tail-lights/brake lights on your toad.

On my Pontiac, I had enough room in the tail lights to wire a dedicated light kit (wiring harness and light bulbs). The new bulbs go into the tail lights so this is a completely independent system, and does not require tapping into the vehicle's lights.

This is an option though only if you have enough room in the tail light bezel to install another set of lights. I am not sure if you have enough room or not in your vehicle.

Other options is to use a diode kit to "steer" 12VDC from both the motorhome and car to the car's tail lights. On older cars this is not a big problem to install. But newer cars, especially with LED tail lights, they sometimes use PCM or other techniques to light the tail lights, and I would highly recommend not using a diode kit on those types of tail lights.

A third option is to use either a wired or wireless portable light system, which consists of two portable tail lights on magnets that you just affix to the vehicle (or perhaps attach to a piece of wood and place on the rear shelf or hatchback shelf).

One Idea I had before installing my tail light kit was since I have a trailer hitch on my toad, was to fashion a bracket that attached to the hitch receiver and mount the temporary lights to the bracket.

Other considerations you might want to make is installing a battery charger that is powered by the motorhome so you keep your toad's battery charged. One novel idea I had (when we were looking at a CR-V), was to make a roof rack bracket for a solar panel and charge the toad battery that way.

But I think too much.

By the way, I have a series of videos that cover the installation of my baseplate, selecting the tow bar, installing the tow bar, and so on that I can put a link to if you have interest.

I plan on doing a video on the brake system and setting up the towing system, but have not done it yet, and since we already have a ft of snow on the ground, I won't be doing that till spring.
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Old 11-18-2014, 03:18 PM   #15
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Thanks much for the information. I would be interested in looking at your videos if it is not too much trouble to link. Thanks again and have a great day.
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Old 11-18-2014, 04:26 PM   #16
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Here is the link:

http://www.rv-project.com/tips/toad.php
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Old 11-18-2014, 04:49 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by ronheb454 View Post
I am now surprised to be reading this since I purchased a 2014 Focus to tow with four wheels down. Everything I read indicated the Focus with automatic could be towed this way. What issues are created during a relearn after hooking the battery back up? Being a GM guy the only thing I noticed about the Focus was the shifting was different than my GM's. I wanted a Chevy Cruze however they could not be towed with four wheels on the ground. After looking at my owners manual again it states to turn the ignition off after confirming the transmission is ready when it was put in neutral. If the ignition is off I am not sure why it is necessary to unhook the negative battery terminal. I'll check with the local Ford dealer. My Focus only had 6 miles on it when I picked it up and it shifted different but fine, no problems. Actually I like the performance of the car for local driving. I am trying to decide which tow bar I want to purchase. I haven't decided that yet and the different braking systems available seem kind of strange and expensive.
There are many things I like about our 2014 Ford Focus such as its power, excellent handling at high speeds in cross winds ability to take fast curves, good gas mileage etc.etc.. The tranny does feel like a manual in that you certainly feel the shifts up and down. When the car is driven aggressively it is one heck of a fine ride. But if you share the car with someone who drives very slowly, especially while the tranny is in its "learning" mode, a different picture, IMO, emerges. It is sort of a Jeckle and Hyde thing.

I took our FF out this morning for a doctor's appointment and heard/felt no clutch chatter and not any unexpected shifting. However three days ago when I drove a friend to the Atlanta Heartsfield airport, he (not me) asked what was wrong with the car--because of the clutch chatter.

Go figure.
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Old 11-18-2014, 06:50 PM   #18
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I have not heard any clutch chatter in my mom's Focus, but I have only driven it a couple of times. I should ask her if she has heard anything like that.
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Old 11-19-2014, 09:49 PM   #19
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Focus as Towed Vehicle

Thanks much for the videos you did a very good job.
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Old 12-10-2014, 09:05 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FW28z View Post
What it really came down to for us was gas station accessibility. This year, we used our RV without towing - at least until late Sept. when we got the Pontiac outfitted.

Of the times we had to fill up at a gas station, two times I had to back out from the pumps.
Last June I purchased an ACME tow dolly to pull a Toyota Prius. Works very well, and it's easy to use. However, the gas station comment is too funny!!

I try to be very careful when selecting a proper gas station that will allow me to safely pull in with a 35' motorhome, with another 17' behind for the toad. There have been occasions where I need to wait for five or six cars to fill and then leave before I can pull into the only slot that will work.

The most fun is when I have left a pump in front of me empty, and then cars keep pulling in to fill, and I can't leave!
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