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mlhamm 07-29-2017 09:05 PM

First Trip Questions
 
We bought a 2013 Thor Tuscany in June and so far have driven it only to a storage facility. We will probably take it out for a day during August but we're looking at a long weekend at a nearby rv park in August or September.

Any tips for a first-timer? I would prefer to not look like a complete fool as I try to get us settled into our site (I'm pretty accomplished at looking like a partial fool and would like to keep it that way).

I figure position the rig, hook up power, water, and sewer, then put down the jacks and put out the slide outs. What have I missed?

Thanks

gbrown 07-29-2017 09:16 PM

First get Ed's Manual. Read it. Make lists.
BUT - most of all have fun.

SuperD 07-29-2017 09:21 PM

This is the order I used with our Tuscany:

Park making sure the hookups are close to your wetbay and electric.

With the engine still running set the parking brake, dump the airbags, put the jacks down (they draw a lot of power and keeping the engine running makes sure you have enough, plus it allows the engine to cool down).

Shut down the engine.

Hookup the electric, water, sewer, and cable before extending the slides, it will save you a headache, literally, from not hitting your head on the slides. (Experience talking here!!!) Also, having a 7/16" wrench is handy for hooking up the tv cable, corrosion sometimes makes it difficult to screw on. I keep a wrench with the cable just for that purpose.

Extend your slides, turn on water heater, AC, extend the awning.

Relax and enjoy yourself!!!

Takes practice to get everything right, and don't worry, everyone starts out as a rookie and no one is going to laugh at you! If you need help ask a fellow camper, most are very friendly and willing to help the "new guy".

mcars302 07-30-2017 10:53 PM

Since I got my surge protector I always plug in first. This allows me to see if there are an issues with the electric. Never know you may have to relocate to another site if the power is bad. After that it's jacks down, then water and lastly sewer. Over time you will develop you own routine and set up. I've been camping for 15 years, I still find myself evolving with regard to set up. The wife and kids pitch in and help now. Remember if your hooked up to sewer you can leave the grey water valve open. Black water valve is always closed and dumped as needed. This allows the water to flush solids away. Walk the campground and see how others set up. Get there early if you can and set up before the rush. The most important advice is get where you going before dark, at least until you have your routine down. Go slow and take your time.

Mike in AZ 07-30-2017 11:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SuperD (Post 80275)
This is the order I used with our Tuscany:

Park making sure the hookups are close to your wetbay and electric.

With the engine still running set the parking brake, dump the airbags, put the jacks down (they draw a lot of power and keeping the engine running makes sure you have enough, plus it allows the engine to cool down).

I am in the same boat as the OP. I often see references to airbags. What are they, and does my '17 Challenger have them?

SuperD 07-31-2017 01:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mike in AZ (Post 80426)
I am in the same boat as the OP. I often see references to airbags. What are they, and does my '17 Challenger have them?

Diesel pushers have air suspension and air brakes. Normally gas coaches do not have air bags unless they are an aftermarket add on and then they are set to a specific pressure. Your Challenger will not have air bags.

ComputerChips 07-31-2017 01:59 AM

If you have the option at your destination get a Pull Through site. This helps, espesially to a newbie or if towing. Another concern for many of us is getting a site with as much shade as possible, cause our air conditioners cant hack it in the summer sun. If you have slides and awnings you may have to check for interference with trees before proceeding too far.

Mike in AZ 07-31-2017 02:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SuperD (Post 80454)
Diesel pushers have air suspension and air brakes. Normally gas coaches do not have air bags unless they are an aftermarket add on and then they are set to a specific pressure. Your Challenger will not have air bags.

Thanks Dave! I forgot, when we were in the shopping phase we did see some pushers and the salesmen mentioned airbags a couple times. I didn't connect it with being specific to diesels.

Can I ask another question? Well, why'd I ask that, I'm gonna ask anyway, lol?

Why are Diesel engines located in the rear? 18 wheelers have engines in the front, so do diesel cars and pickups...

gmc 07-31-2017 12:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mike in AZ (Post 80472)
...Why are Diesel engines located in the rear? 18 wheelers have engines in the front, so do diesel cars and pickups...

My 2 cents:
They aren't designing a chassis specifically for MH use - they are using what is out there already - for class A diesels typically a bus related chassis - most of which have their engines in the rear...

Removing the driver/passenger from the noise and heat of the engine is another nice part - but think it is really the available choices for the chassis driving the direction.

On class C diesels (Super C), they are typically using a 'box truck' type chassis - these have the 'standard' hood up front with the engine.

SuperD 07-31-2017 02:00 PM

GMC is correct, bus style chassis and getting the noise and heat away from the driver. There were some "FRED" chassis (front engine diesel) built a few years ago but they were never popular and I don't think anyone builds them anymore.

Next time you have a chance also look at how big the Diesel engine compartment is, not really enough room at the front for all that machinery, FRED chassis had a relatively small engine.

Mike in AZ 07-31-2017 02:11 PM

I did not know Class C diesels are up front, and the bus chassis makes sense. Thank you both!

axis earl 07-31-2017 03:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SuperD (Post 80538)
GMC is correct, bus style chassis and getting the noise and heat away from the driver. There were some "FRED" chassis (front engine diesel) built a few years ago but they were never popular and I don't think anyone builds them anymore.

Next time you have a chance also look at how big the Diesel engine compartment is, not really enough room at the front for all that machinery, FRED chassis had a relatively small engine.

https://rvs.autotrader.com/rvs/2011/...esta/300135905 Here is one that comes to mind, but, looking at the Monaco web site, as you said, they are not sold anymore.

Joe-FL 07-31-2017 07:45 PM

I have set up using the same procedure as SuperD since getting our Challenger. When we first got into RVing with fivers we would plug into the pedestal first to check for good electric, but in 3 years of full time traveling we only found one that was bad, so now I do everything else, then hook up, then put slides out.


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