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Old 08-07-2022, 02:42 AM   #1
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Question 2019 ford v10 gas improvement&performance

what would be some of the upgrades I can do to get better performance on my v10.. people talk about cold air intake, chips, tuners and changing gears in the rear end...etc... I am getting only 6 mpg at high speed 60to 70 mph. I need advice from you guys who have the ford v10...and some guys said just drive slower.

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Old 08-07-2022, 03:05 AM   #2
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We get about the same on our E 450 V10 when I am towing our Jeep Unlimited. But on flat roads without the Jeep in tow, we get 7-7.5. thrown in a mountain or a head wind and all bets are off. not sure there is anything I can do. I usually drive 60-65 MPH using TowHaul most of the time when pulling the Jeep.
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Old 08-07-2022, 04:02 AM   #3
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You could spend $100s to $1000s on those so called performance/mileage improvements & go from 6 mpg to possibly??? 8 mpg, how long would it take at the very optimistic 2 mpg to ever recoup the cost of those improvements?
That V10 was built for horsepower & torque attempting to be an alternative to diesel, it does at it was designed but the cost for that is fuel, it will pass everything on the highway but a gas station.
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Old 08-07-2022, 06:38 AM   #4
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Slowing down it’s the best you can do. On the first leg of our current trip pulling our Jeep going in a 20-25 mph head wind we manage 6.25 mpg. And that was going 63mph.

The best we have gotten was 9mpg that was the average for a 6000 mile trip. We weren’t pulling our Jeep and kept speed around 63. There is only so much you can. The go fast parts don’t really work.

If they did work Ford would equip them on their vehicles
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Old 08-07-2022, 10:59 AM   #5
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Have you tried different fuels?

I realize gasoline is expensive, but I have fueled up with high-test, and at times with 100% no ethanol gasoline in our: V10 2016 Outlaw.
I had usually got 8 mpg, and loaded down as low as 6 mpg. Now I have seen 10 and 11 mpg. It is not consistent, I blame it on the more expensive fuels for the better mpg, I just do not want to spend the money and time searching out the 100% gasoline all the time, if that is why the increase. Believe me, I check every fuel up, and sometimes it goes back to 7.5 mpg or something.

I also try to not drive faster than 65 mph. Keep the tires properly inflated, and wash the front end off before a trip, using a sponge mop to reach the higher part, lol.

Back 20+ years ago, driving my big old hog (motorcycle), I would use the same brand all the time, like BP, then I would stop at Marathon and fill up (always not more than 2/3 low. Then I would get better mileage. So I would switch over to find out back to the old rut of normal mpg.

I began to believe the blend of different manufacturers was why the better mpg, and that may have been, and maybe why the RV does better too.
So, I try not to be too loyal to one brand, and likewise to the octane. Seems 8 to 10 is the result.
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Old 08-07-2022, 11:57 AM   #6
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Iím on the smaller 16k GVWR chassis. We tow a 12ft dual axle trailer with a Smart car, bikes, etc on it. Weighs around 3500 lbs. overall we average 7 mpg. Remember, running your generator to use the house AC will use fuel too. I think the Duck said under a load my Onan 4000 uses .8 gal per hour. Usually drive @ 65 mph. If Iím in town or on secondary roads in hilly situation, I use the tow mode . Once on the highway, at speed, I turn it off. Changes the shifting points so probably causes to burn more fuel. Iíve also been told that towing 4 down uses more fuel than with a dolly or trailer. However, I have no scientific evidence ( so donít beat me up guys).
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Old 08-07-2022, 01:17 PM   #7
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We get a little over 7 while towing our dolly (2014 F53 V10 22K GVWR under a 2015 Hurricane 34E - 5 speed). I cruise at about 63-65. I also use tow haul mode which seems to help with how it handled up grades (less premature down shifting). Also, coming up to steep grades, I bring the speed way down so I am not cranking at 5K RPM trying to maintain 60. It really is about how you drive it, and where you are driving. But flat level driving, you should be getting 7ish assuming you are not running genset.
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Old 08-07-2022, 04:35 PM   #8
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It is all about aerodynamics

Rolling resistance, aerodynamic friction and drive-line efficiency all work together to determine fuel mileage.
Rolling resistance can be separated into tire pressure, tire design and vehicle weight. The higher the tire pressure, the less the tire flexes and the less energy is lost as heat, but the ride will be sacrificed. For class A tires there is little difference in tire design. Wide singles instead of duals give better mileage but not much, so the less tires touching the road the better. About 70% of the tires rolling resistance is determined by weight, so lighter is better. Rolling resistance does increase with speed but it is linear. That is why the tires get hotter the fasted you drive.
Aerodynamic friction can be divided into bow wave and surface friction. The smoother the surface the better. Wax does help. Any protuberance on a flat service causes increase in resistance (drag). Rooftop A/C, vents, antennas all contribute to resistance. The greatest drag per square foot in the front is a flat plate and the best is a cone and the same for the rear. Although Aerodynamic drag is very small below 45 mph, but increases as the square of the speed above that. As for making an aerodynamic tail on an RV, see the Kammback aerodynamic effect.

Gasoline engines are most efficient at WOT, as the act of reducing the airflow into the engine causes a decrease in engine efficiency. That means you want the smallest displacement engine that will do the work required. The more gears in the transmission the better as they are able to keep the engine in the best operating range for the power required. All torque converters generate heat when not locked up. Generating heat means using fuel. The looser the torque converter (loose torque converter generate more torque multiplication than do tight torque converters), the more fuel is used.
Anytime you use the brakes. you are turning energy into heat. The less you use the brakes the better the fuel mileage.
Just some tips for better fuel mileage. Some of these things are easily done, others require modification and some are never practical.
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Old 08-07-2022, 05:50 PM   #9
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The simple answer is NO, don't waste your $$!
However it is your $$ so if you want to add ALL those goodies then go ahead you're not going to hurt the vehicle, but don't expect to get 12-14 mpg or lift the front wheels leaving a stop light from a motorhome with the Ford V10.
We had Ford 3/4 & 1 ton pickups with the V10 at work that would only get 7-8 mpg carrying nothing but a toolbox with tools.
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Old 08-07-2022, 06:48 PM   #10
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I quit checking actual mpg about 3 years ago. I have not had a problem since I still have to fill up before every trip. Does not matter is genny runs the entire trip or not, I have to fill up again as I approach 1/4 tank, or if I see a really good bargain on gas. Last time I bought gas it was $3.32/gallon. I couldn't tell you how many gallons I bought, I didn't care; but I promise you I filled it up 101% of capacity. I drive 70 mph because that is what I view as the safest. I have fewer trucks passing me and I can overtake slow drivers and RVs with ease.
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Old 08-07-2022, 09:03 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beau388 View Post
Rolling resistance, aerodynamic friction and drive-line efficiency all work together to determine fuel mileage.
Rolling resistance can be separated into tire pressure, tire design and vehicle weight. The higher the tire pressure, the less the tire flexes and the less energy is lost as heat, but the ride will be sacrificed. For class A tires there is little difference in tire design. Wide singles instead of duals give better mileage but not much, so the less tires touching the road the better. About 70% of the tires rolling resistance is determined by weight, so lighter is better. Rolling resistance does increase with speed but it is linear. That is why the tires get hotter the fasted you drive.
Aerodynamic friction can be divided into bow wave and surface friction. The smoother the surface the better. Wax does help. Any protuberance on a flat service causes increase in resistance (drag). Rooftop A/C, vents, antennas all contribute to resistance. The greatest drag per square foot in the front is a flat plate and the best is a cone and the same for the rear. Although Aerodynamic drag is very small below 45 mph, but increases as the square of the speed above that. As for making an aerodynamic tail on an RV, see the Kammback aerodynamic effect.

Gasoline engines are most efficient at WOT, as the act of reducing the airflow into the engine causes a decrease in engine efficiency. That means you want the smallest displacement engine that will do the work required. The more gears in the transmission the better as they are able to keep the engine in the best operating range for the power required. All torque converters generate heat when not locked up. Generating heat means using fuel. The looser the torque converter (loose torque converter generate more torque multiplication than do tight torque converters), the more fuel is used.
Anytime you use the brakes. you are turning energy into heat. The less you use the brakes the better the fuel mileage.
Just some tips for better fuel mileage. Some of these things are easily done, others require modification and some are never practical.
Using abbreviations again. WTH is WOT?
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Old 08-07-2022, 09:10 PM   #12
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Wide open throttle
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Old 08-07-2022, 10:22 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by 1Hurricane View Post
what would be some of the upgrades I can do to get better performance on my v10.. people talk about cold air intake, chips, tuners and changing gears in the rear end...etc... I am getting only 6 mpg at high speed 60to 70 mph. I need advice from you guys who have the ford v10...and some guys said just drive slower.

You have rock star tour bus! 6 to 7 Miles per gallon!

Join the party!
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Old 08-08-2022, 08:04 PM   #14
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Fuel mileage data

1Hurricane has asked for fuel mileage improvement suggestions. Before I share what I have learned so far, let me share the data I have. 2018 Vegas 25.3 with no toad on the E-450 chassis with the V-10.


Have not done any mods to the engine or the computer. I do change the air filter every 10,000 miles. Actual weight loaded with 2 people, gas, water & fridge full: 12,600#. Bought it new in Jan 2019 with 1010 miles on it.


A while back, I posted fuel mileage at 25,000 miles. It was 10.66 mpg for all miles and 125 hrs on the genny. Now at 49,035 miles and 179 hrs on the genny, the mpg for all miles is 10.54. See fuel log below.


So how do I drive? I feather-foot all starts, trying to let it shift by 2300 or less. Then I engage tow haul once in high gear. Drive 63 or less, disengage the cruise if I see a hill that will force a downshift, and add only enough throttle to keep it in high gear down to about 45. Basically, let it fall off with the big trucks instead of burning the engine and the fuel to maintain 63 up the hill. This keeps it in the higher gears longer. I found that I have been able to pull many of the big highway grades in 5th gear that way. Also, as a retired truck driver, I always appreciated a driver who chose not to play leap frog all day in the hills. Very slow truck: of course go around him.


On the downhill, leave it in tow-haul. Each time you depress the brake and let off, it will drop a gear. On a big grade you will find a gear that will hold your speed without much braking. Lightly touching the brake will not cause a downshift. If it sticks in too low of a gear, turn off tow haul for a moment and start downshifting again as needed.


Everyone drives differently and has different priorities. This is not at all a "Telling you how to drive" post. Only sharing what I have learned over the first 50,000 miles on our Vegas. Happy Trails
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Old 08-14-2022, 12:11 AM   #15
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Gas Mileage improvement

I hear a lot of people say that you can't really improve the mileage on one of these beasts. I have a 2004 Windsport Class A. It has the Workhorse chassis and has the 8.1 liter V-8 which is a stroked out 454. When I bought the rig, I was getting 7 mpg on the flatland of South Carolina. I looked into a Banks kit at 5000 dollars and a lot of work. I then bought a new computer from Ultra RV Products in New Jersey for $500. Three bolts and a clip and it took 5 minutes to install.
Mileage went up to 8.5 which paid for it the first summer. My best is on the flat in SC with 9-9.4 mpg. Towing my Escape on a tow dolly gets me 7-7.5.
Just took a trip to the Adirondacks of NY towing the car and averaged 7 mpg which is pretty good considering the mountains of Pa. and NY.
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Old 08-14-2022, 02:04 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1Hurricane View Post
what would be some of the upgrades I can do to get better performance on my v10.. people talk about cold air intake, chips, tuners and changing gears in the rear end...etc... I am getting only 6 mpg at high speed 60to 70 mph. I need advice from you guys who have the ford v10...and some guys said just drive slower.
I have a 2018 Windsport 29m with the V-10. I got a Scan-Gauge and like most V-10's when I did some driving checks the best speed for max mileage was 63 mph. other than taking off slow and just keeping your foot out of the carb I'm not familiar with any mods you can do. If you find any------LET ME KNOW!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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Old 08-14-2022, 02:11 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beau388 View Post
Rolling resistance, aerodynamic friction and drive-line efficiency all work together to determine fuel mileage.
Rolling resistance can be separated into tire pressure, tire design and vehicle weight. The higher the tire pressure, the less the tire flexes and the less energy is lost as heat, but the ride will be sacrificed. For class A tires there is little difference in tire design. Wide singles instead of duals give better mileage but not much, so the less tires touching the road the better. About 70% of the tires rolling resistance is determined by weight, so lighter is better. Rolling resistance does increase with speed but it is linear. That is why the tires get hotter the fasted you drive.
Aerodynamic friction can be divided into bow wave and surface friction. The smoother the surface the better. Wax does help. Any protuberance on a flat service causes increase in resistance (drag). Rooftop A/C, vents, antennas all contribute to resistance. The greatest drag per square foot in the front is a flat plate and the best is a cone and the same for the rear. Although Aerodynamic drag is very small below 45 mph, but increases as the square of the speed above that. As for making an aerodynamic tail on an RV, see the Kammback aerodynamic effect.

Gasoline engines are most efficient at WOT, as the act of reducing the airflow into the engine causes a decrease in engine efficiency. That means you want the smallest displacement engine that will do the work required. The more gears in the transmission the better as they are able to keep the engine in the best operating range for the power required. All torque converters generate heat when not locked up. Generating heat means using fuel. The looser the torque converter (loose torque converter generate more torque multiplication than do tight torque converters), the more fuel is used.
Anytime you use the brakes. you are turning energy into heat. The less you use the brakes the better the fuel mileage.
Just some tips for better fuel mileage. Some of these things are easily done, others require modification and some are never practical.
How do you get a loose torque converter?? Bob
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Old 08-14-2022, 10:41 AM   #18
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MPG towing Jeep Wrangler

I just returned from a 3800 mile trip from Florida, Michigan, Wisconsin and back to Florida. 2019 Thor Vegas with E450 V-10 towing 2 door Jeep Wrangler.

Worst MPG was 8.5 in hills in Kentucky and Tennessee. Generator was running much of the time. Speed was 60mph.

Best mileage was 10.3 in Wisconsin and Illinois. Little generator use and speed of 60-62 mph. Flat terrain with few stops. One tank reached 11 MPG.

The greatest effect on MPG was pulling an extra 4000 lb. in hilly terrain.

Worst roads of trip were in Michigan and Illinois-long stetches of bad patching, cracked concrete, and jarring bumps. Best roads (no surprise) were in Florida. Worst traffic was in Traverse City, MI.
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Old 08-14-2022, 12:53 PM   #19
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If my RV was fixed to only drive 60 - 63 mph max; and get 10 mpg; I would gladly pay $50/per trip to be able to drive 75 - 78 mpg getting only 7.5 - 8 mpg.

If for no other reason, I have found it safer passing trucks 70% of the time versus being passed by trucks 70% of the time.

I NEVER calculate my actual MPG anymore, because it will not mean anything. Who cares what the exact cost / kwh is when it is 100 degrees outside? You bought that house knowing the square footage and the AC requirements.

That is my way of saying it is hard to imagine that Ford Engineering has not already maximized F-53 v10 gas performance for the masses of conditions. I am thankful I can drive the speed limit.
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Old 08-14-2022, 01:27 PM   #20
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1Hurricane posted once and hasnít participated since. Sounds like he didnít find the magic bullet that will improve fuel economy much on a 36í long, 12í-2Ē tall, and 8í-3Ē wide motorhome weighing 22,000 pounds, and most likely also towing a car or other vehicle.

I often wonder what buyers actually expect when choosing motorhomes this large.

Itís not rocket science, right? Posts above report much better fuel economy for Axis/Vegas Class As with similar V10 (2-valve versus OPís 3-valve but that wonít make much difference either), so itís not the V10 that is the main problem.

Taken an additional step, my V10 delivers 15 MPG regularly and I have gotten up to 17 MPG a couple of times when driving slowly on scenic routes. Granted, modern engines can be made (designed) slightly more fuel efficient, but if anyone wants significant improvements in fuel economy, start by reducing required energy per mile. Basically, smaller, lighter, and more aerodynamic motorhomes, and driving slower will improve fuel economy a lot more than differences between engines. In other words, a 10% reduction in engine fuel consumption is huge, but a 10% reduction in required energy per mile is pretty easy to achieve.

Iím not saying there is anything wrong with large motorhomes that get 6~7 MPG, or that anyone should downsize, just that buyers should be realistic when choosing motorhomes regarding what their fuel economy will be.
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