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Old 06-14-2020, 01:13 AM   #41
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Originally Posted by cavie View Post
How did this 3 year old thread get drug up? you would get better response by starting a new thread.

Usually it is Kitchen and dinette that are dead and everything else is dead.

Start at the PED with a volt meter and check all connections back to your circuit breaker box in that order. If 50 amp you need to see 240 L1 to L2. If 30 amp you need to see 120 volts.
We are new to forums and find it hard to navigate
How do you create a new thread?
Yes I have a short somewhere on 2 circuits and we will have to trace back all the connections.
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Old 06-14-2020, 02:34 AM   #42
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QUOTE=sajorgens@sbcglobal.net;238449]We are new to forums and find it hard to navigate
How do you create a new thread?
Yes I have a short somewhere on 2 circuits and we will have to trace back all the connections.[/QUOTE]

OK, now we are on track with something current. Go to the Forum box next to Home top left of this page. Pick the relevant forum you wish to be in. ON top left of that page you will see a button that says New Thread.

Ask the Moderators the change your user name. Do not use you email address. That would be a good 1st post. Tell us again about your problem because it is the reverse of what most have. Now you have 2 circuits not working?? Tells us what circuits. All outlets involved. Do you even know the definition of a short? Most people use the word wrongly all the time.
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Old 06-21-2020, 12:03 PM   #43
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Originally Posted by RVnewbie30FE View Post
TheTraveler, yes I am plugged in at home with the correct power converter of 30/15.
Wait!! This is not your first RV? You regularly connect your motorhome to shore power at your house? You should NOT be using a 15 amp or 20 amp outlet in your garage for that purpose. It will work when the loads are light, and it will keep your batteries charged, but eventually it will pop a breaker when the electrical load is heavy, like when somebody flips on the AC unit.

You should definitely invest a little money in a true 30A RV outdoor outlet, installed by an electrician. This will give you the full 30A that you get at a campsite, PLUS it will eliminate that household extension cord that you have been using.

The 15/20A method should be reserved for when you camp in a friend's driveway who does not own an RV.
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Old 06-21-2020, 12:14 PM   #44
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Originally Posted by RVnewbie30FE View Post
I had also assumed that I had power from the house! Shame on me for being lazy & having the "woman" mentality of trusting a man to do the job hehe After reading tenbear's comment on my power coming from battery, my brainstorming kept coming back to problems with my own power supply, either the cord or else the house outlet. I have indeed learned my lesson to do it myself! You are all awesome & I hope this will help other people to get ideas to fix their own problems with this thread.
I have seen this once (actually hundreds of times) before.

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Old 06-21-2020, 12:18 PM   #45
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I'm shocked sometimes that some folks want to point fingers and 'take someone to task' for simple things RV related, like the above mentioned use of an adapter.... really??

people all over this country RV and camp all the time in many different and various ways - telling someone that "the blah/blah/blah should ONLY be reserved for when you camp in a friend's driveway who does not own an RV" is just plain selfish talk.... what gives? Why would you make this type of 'demand' on someone? I don't get it. People use adapters ALL THE TIME for many different situations, that's EXACTLY what they are there for! Whether someone chooses to use an adapter ALL THE TIME, or just for various situations, make NO DIFFERENCE. Stop 'judging'....
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Old 06-21-2020, 12:35 PM   #46
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an old thread? that's OK with me

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Originally Posted by cavie View Post
How did this 3 year old thread get drug up? you would get better response by starting a new thread.
I see this philosophy in many forums all over the Web.
Why do people think that old threads are automatically bad and only new thread are good?

I've learned plenty from old threads. And, I've asked many questions that effectively "revive" an old thread. Why would anybody want to start a whole new discussion on a topic that has already been thoroughly discussed? The science of Electricity hasn't changed in three years.

That brings us to the topic of "locked" threads. Why would any sysop want to prevent additional comments on a particular subject? Maybe if every possible answer had already been provided, which is NEVER true.
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Old 06-21-2020, 12:41 PM   #47
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Originally Posted by Wiley1 View Post
I see this philosophy in many forums all over the Web.
Why do people think that old threads are automatically bad and only new thread are good?

I've learned plenty from old threads. And, I've asked many questions that effectively "revive" an old thread. Why would anybody want to start a whole new discussion on a topic that has already been thoroughly discussed? The science of Electricity hasn't changed in three years.

That brings us to the topic of "locked" threads. Why would any sysop want to prevent additional comments on a particular subject? Maybe if every possible answer had already been provided, which is NEVER true.
My poit was you hyjack a thread instead of starting a new one. Many people see a three year old thread and keep right on going.
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Old 06-21-2020, 12:43 PM   #48
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i'm shocked sometimes that some folks want to point fingers and 'take someone to task' for simple things rv related, like the above mentioned use of an adapter.... Really??

People all over this country rv and camp all the time in many different and various ways - telling someone that "the blah/blah/blah should only be reserved for when you camp in a friend's driveway who does not own an rv" is just plain selfish talk.... What gives? Why would you make this type of 'demand' on someone? I don't get it. People use adapters all the time for many different situations, that's exactly what they are there for! Whether someone chooses to use an adapter all the time, or just for various situations, make no difference. Stop 'judging'....
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Old 06-21-2020, 05:03 PM   #49
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let's put this into context

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Originally Posted by TurnerFam View Post
I'm shocked sometimes that some folks want to point fingers and 'take someone to task' for simple things RV related, like the above mentioned use of an adapter.... really??

people all over this country RV and camp all the time in many different and various ways - telling someone that "the blah/blah/blah should ONLY be reserved for when you camp in a friend's driveway who does not own an RV" is just plain selfish talk.... what gives? Why would you make this type of 'demand' on someone? I don't get it. People use adapters ALL THE TIME for many different situations, that's EXACTLY what they are there for! Whether someone chooses to use an adapter ALL THE TIME, or just for various situations, make NO DIFFERENCE. Stop 'judging'....
Would it be possible to limit this discussion to facts, and leave the emotion out of it? I'm an electrician and a scientist. I'm not judging anybody and I'm not interested in "taking anybody to task". I was offering useful advice for anybody who wants to hear it. Anyone can take my advice in the spirit it was offered or ignore my advice for any reason.
You are the one doing the judging here. I'm just offering some facts and a few opinions for constructive discussion.
Just possibly, there is somebody out there who can benefit.

Let's go over the facts:
- electrically, it is OK to connect a low current device to high current outlet. We do it everyday.
- it is NOT a good idea to connect a high current device to a low current outlet. It will work, to a point, but it is a terrible idea. Why? Because, your device may draw more current than the circuit was designed to deliver. If that condition lasts long enough, the breaker in the panel is supposed to trip. Why? To protect the wiring inside the wall, and protect the house, and the outlet, and the connected equipment, and the person using the equipment. If everything is working properly, you might hear a loud pop or you might hear the cables shaking inside the wall, but you probably won't burn the house down because the excess current didn't last long enough to catch anything on fire. The breaker has done its job and no harm is done except that everything on that circuit was abruptly powered down. However, if the breaker does not perform as intended, you could have melted wiring inside the walls, and the house could be reduced to a pile of ashes.
- a class-C motorhome is generally a 30A (single phase) device. That means it is designed to draw up to, and no more than, 30A of 120vac current continuously from a shore power source before the main breaker in the MH's electrical panel trips.
- most RV campsites offer 30A or 50A outlets. There is a reason they don't offer 20A outlets except for tent campers and they definitely don't hand out gender-bending adapters for people to intentionally overload circuits.

Now I will offer some opinions:
- I would discourage anyone from powering a 20A washing machine from a 15A outlet. Why? Because the washing machine is likely to draw more than 15A and that is more current than the outlet is designed to deliver. The breaker could trip or the wiring could fry.
- Likewise, I would discourage anyone from connecting a 30A RV to a 15A outlet. We have all done it, in a pinch, but it is dangerous. In some cases, it might be your only source of power. But, don't be surprised if the breaker trips as soon as you turned on the AC unit. Or, maybe the AC works fine until you press a button on the microwave. Then Bam! The RV drew more than 15A and the circuit went dead. There is risk involved in this arrangement.
- The technically correct way to connect a 30A RV is by using a true 30A outlet. I installed one at my last house and I installed one in my new house. Why? Because I don't want to risk burning up my breakers, my electrical panel, my house wiring, my extension cords, or the equipment in my RV.
- When I visit friends, and I ask where I can connect my RV, my first choice would be a 30A RV outlet. If they own an RV, they probably have one of those. My second choice would be a 20A kitchen or washing machine outlet. My third choice would be a 15A household outlet. My absolute last choice would be a 15A GFCI or AFCI outlet.
- Because I understand electricity, I know to never run my AC unit over a 15A connection. Some people might not be aware of that issue.
- I also know to always use the shortest possible 20A or 25A extension cord. Why? Because the longer the cord, the more resistance it has. Resistance causes a voltage drop and heat. A cord that is too thin or too long can easily melt and start a fire.
- I have never driven my car into a tree to find out if the air bags were functioning. I do not recommend that anybody should pull more than 15A through a $4.00 household breaker to see if it is working correctly.

Conclusions:
- If you own a 30A RV and you regularly connect to shore power at your house, you should consider installing a true 30A RV outlet. In the long run, it is good insurance to keep your home safe and allow you to use all the equipment in your rig without overloading the circuit.
- Anytime you connect a 30A device to a outlet designed for less than 30A, you are taking a risk. If you understand and accept that risk, that is your business, not mine.

So, now that you have the facts, and a few of my opinions, you can judge me if you like. But, you don't know what is in my heart, so please don't assume.
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Old 06-21-2020, 05:56 PM   #50
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Originally Posted by Wiley1 View Post
Would it be possible to limit this discussion to facts, and leave the emotion out of it? I'm an electrician and a scientist. I'm not judging anybody and I'm not interested in "taking anybody to task". I was offering useful advice for anybody who wants to hear it. Anyone can take my advice in the spirit it was offered or ignore my advice for any reason.
You are the one doing the judging here. I'm just offering some facts and a few opinions for constructive discussion.
Just possibly, there is somebody out there who can benefit.

Let's go over the facts:
- electrically, it is OK to connect a low current device to high current outlet. We do it everyday.
- it is NOT a good idea to connect a high current device to a low current outlet. It will work, to a point, but it is a terrible idea. Why? Because, your device may draw more current than the circuit was designed to deliver. If that condition lasts long enough, the breaker in the panel is supposed to trip. Why? To protect the wiring inside the wall, and protect the house, and the outlet, and the connected equipment, and the person using the equipment. If everything is working properly, you might hear a loud pop or you might hear the cables shaking inside the wall, but you probably won't burn the house down because the excess current didn't last long enough to catch anything on fire. The breaker has done its job and no harm is done except that everything on that circuit was abruptly powered down. However, if the breaker does not perform as intended, you could have melted wiring inside the walls, and the house could be reduced to a pile of ashes.
- a class-C motorhome is generally a 30A (single phase) device. That means it is designed to draw up to, and no more than, 30A of 120vac current continuously from a shore power source before the main breaker in the MH's electrical panel trips.
- most RV campsites offer 30A or 50A outlets. There is a reason they don't offer 20A outlets except for tent campers and they definitely don't hand out gender-bending adapters for people to intentionally overload circuits.

Now I will offer some opinions:
- I would discourage anyone from powering a 20A washing machine from a 15A outlet. Why? Because the washing machine is likely to draw more than 15A and that is more current than the outlet is designed to deliver. The breaker could trip or the wiring could fry.
- Likewise, I would discourage anyone from connecting a 30A RV to a 15A outlet. We have all done it, in a pinch, but it is dangerous. In some cases, it might be your only source of power. But, don't be surprised if the breaker trips as soon as you turned on the AC unit. Or, maybe the AC works fine until you press a button on the microwave. Then Bam! The RV drew more than 15A and the circuit went dead. There is risk involved in this arrangement.
- The technically correct way to connect a 30A RV is by using a true 30A outlet. I installed one at my last house and I installed one in my new house. Why? Because I don't want to risk burning up my breakers, my electrical panel, my house wiring, my extension cords, or the equipment in my RV.
- When I visit friends, and I ask where I can connect my RV, my first choice would be a 30A RV outlet. If they own an RV, they probably have one of those. My second choice would be a 20A kitchen or washing machine outlet. My third choice would be a 15A household outlet. My absolute last choice would be a 15A GFCI or AFCI outlet.
- Because I understand electricity, I know to never run my AC unit over a 15A connection. Some people might not be aware of that issue.
- I also know to always use the shortest possible 20A or 25A extension cord. Why? Because the longer the cord, the more resistance it has. Resistance causes a voltage drop and heat. A cord that is too thin or too long can easily melt and start a fire.
- I have never driven my car into a tree to find out if the air bags were functioning. I do not recommend that anybody should pull more than 15A through a $4.00 household breaker to see if it is working correctly.

Conclusions:
- If you own a 30A RV and you regularly connect to shore power at your house, you should consider installing a true 30A RV outlet. In the long run, it is good insurance to keep your home safe and allow you to use all the equipment in your rig without overloading the circuit.
- Anytime you connect a 30A device to a outlet designed for less than 30A, you are taking a risk. If you understand and accept that risk, that is your business, not mine.

So, now that you have the facts, and a few of my opinions, you can judge me if you like. But, you don't know what is in my heart, so please don't assume.
WOW! That's a lot or words!

You jumped in and responded to a post that was over 3 years old; not to help the poster but to tell them they are doing something wrong IN YOUR OPINION. The poster had already resolved their problem and your opinion flies in the face of standard practice with RVers across the country.

There is no 30 amp device - any RV with a 30 amp connection can pull more than 30 amps easily. Most RVers know they can't run their air conditioner when using a common 30 amp to 15 amp adapter and they don't intend to. They want to keep their batteries charged and cool the fridge. The 15/20 amp breaker in the house will limit their current draw. You shouldn't say it shouldn't be done - it's done daily with no ill consequences.

Now on the other hand if you want to camp/reside in your RV at home than it is an excellent idea to install an RV 30 Amp connection (or 50 Amp for those so inclined).

So now we have three themes in this thread:

The OP's issue which has been resolved.
A new poster with a similar problem seeking help.
Your discussion about RV electricity which hasn't helped either problem.

It's easy to see why this should easily be 3 different threads for continuity and clarity.
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Old 06-21-2020, 06:11 PM   #51
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Old 06-23-2020, 12:42 PM   #52
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16ACE27 really said it well...

thanks

many of us use adapters for many different reasons on a regular basic, and the adapter does exactly what it's designed for - to allow you to plug in a larger/different male cord into a smaller/different female outlet. It is designed to allow the correct flow of amperage for the size breaker that the outlet is attached to. It is designed to allow the use of a smaller 'power' source than the RV is typically plugged into, or vice versa.

Adapters get a bad rap from a chosen few. I'm not sure why, but there is some thought that somehow an 'adapter' is not as up to par as other methods of receiving electrical power. The adapter, though, is simply another 'connection' between two sets of wires, that's all. Just like your shore cord Male plug end, which itself is actually an 'adapter', to allow it to 'plug in' to an outlet. The outlet itself is an 'adapter', allowing two sets of wires to 'come together' in a convenient method - that's all.

They're ALL adapters. Use them as you need to.

FUN!
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Old 06-23-2020, 01:30 PM   #53
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Originally Posted by Wiley1 View Post
Wait!! This is not your first RV? You regularly connect your motorhome to shore power at your house? You should NOT be using a 15 amp or 20 amp outlet in your garage for that purpose. It will work when the loads are light, and it will keep your batteries charged, but eventually it will pop a breaker when the electrical load is heavy, like when somebody flips on the AC unit.

You should definitely invest a little money in a true 30A RV outdoor outlet, installed by an electrician. This will give you the full 30A that you get at a campsite, PLUS it will eliminate that household extension cord that you have been using.

The 15/20A method should be reserved for when you camp in a friend's driveway who does not own an RV.
Why the heck would I want to pull a new electrical service to my house and change my electric panel just to plug my RV in to keep the batteries charged and run the fridge before a trip?

We ran a freaking Chevy Volt off the same outlet for three years! Yes it took overnight to charge but if we needed it before then it had an engine too!
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Old 08-10-2020, 07:46 PM   #54
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Why the heck would I want to pull a new electrical service to my house and change my electric panel just to plug my RV in to keep the batteries charged and run the fridge before a trip?
Yes, I agree. What you describe would make no sense for many reasons.
  • Most people have space in their electrical panel for one additional 30A single-pole breaker. Then you would only need an RV outlet and some 10-2 cable. It cost me about $25 when I did it inside the garage and about $75 when I used an outdoor weatherproof box.
  • If your panel is too small, it would be crazy expensive to replace it.
  • If the electrical service to your house can't handle an additional 15A, it would be prohibitively expensive to upgrade it.
  • If you only need to charge batteries, keep the fridge cold, and turn on a few LED lights, all those things combined aren't likely to draw more than 12A. So, no issues on a 15A circuit.

The reason that works for you, Pete, is because you understand the limitations of a 15A breaker and an extension cord of a certain length. You might be amazed at how many people don't have a clue about those things. Some think that, if the plug can be jammed into the socket, it is good to go.

At my house, I chose to spend a few bucks for a 30A RV outlet. Why?
  • My wife doesn't calculate electrical loads in her head. When she goes out to the MH to make a bed or stock some cabinets, the first thing she might do is flip on the AC.
  • I want to be able to use everything in my driveway that I can use at a campsite, including the AC.
  • If my house is getting drywall or being repainted, I might want to live in the MH for a day or two.
  • I don't want to see a household extension cord overheat and melt.
  • I don't want breakers popping inside my panel.
  • No adapter is needed.

That's just me. I like to do things the right way. For a small amount of money, it provides better utility and safety.
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Old 08-10-2020, 08:19 PM   #55
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Originally Posted by RVnewbie30FE View Post
TheTraveler, yes I am plugged in at home with the correct power converter of 30/15. All breakers were checked & I even tried different outlets around the garage side. We never had problems with our Cruise RV travel trailer so I'm perplexed as why I get enough power to work the slides, lights etc but not the electrical outlets & microwave. I plan to call the guy who did the new RV walk through with me at CW. I'll keep everyone posted on what he says. Thank you!
The problem is you are plugging into a GFI circuit at home. No GFI circuit at a campground and no GFI circuit from your Genny. 2 GFI's in series do not play nice. If you are at home turn off the GFI in your RV. GFI controls any outlet within 6 ' of a water sorce. and any outlet with ground level access. Microwave is not supposed to be in the GFI circuit but many are. go get your RV from the dealer.
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Old 08-10-2020, 08:27 PM   #56
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The problem is you are plugging into a GFI circuit at home. No GFI circuit at a campground and no GFI circuit from your Genny. 2 GFI's in series do not play nice. If you are at home turn off the GFI in your RV. GFI controls any outlet within 6 ' of a water sorce. and any outlet with ground level access. Microwave is not supposed to be in the GFI circuit but many are. go get your RV from the dealer.
Ummmmmmm, he probably did................ 3 YEARS AGO
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Old 08-10-2020, 08:31 PM   #57
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Ummmmmmm, he probably did................ 3 YEARS AGO
the op might not see it but a newbie with the same issue will benefit.!!!!

And next week we will be having this same conversation with a new OP.
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