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Old 01-25-2020, 09:02 PM   #41
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Old 01-25-2020, 09:06 PM   #42
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Gives me something to do. Help teach the newbies. The misinformation I see on these forums drives me NUTS!
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Old 01-26-2020, 12:05 AM   #43
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50 AMP Voltage

Yes it is 220 volts, don’t be confused by people not familiar with wiring, if people think you can run two ACs and other 110 volt items on 50 Amps of 110 , then they delusional. Your electrician is correct.

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Old 01-26-2020, 12:13 AM   #44
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Yes it is 220 volts, don’t be confused by people not familiar with wiring, if people think you can run two ACs and other 110 volt items on 50 Amps of 110 , then they delusional. Your electrician is correct.

JohnK
People do this all the time in a 30 Amp RV with a single air conditioner; then they add a second air conditioner with a separate 20 amp plug. That would be 30 Amps at 120 VAC plus 20 Amps at 120 VAC for a total of 50 Amps at 120 VAC.
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Old 01-26-2020, 12:48 AM   #45
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Find another electrician, real fast. Make certain that they understand the specs and wiring for RV receptacles. They are NOT 50 amp 220 volts like your home dryer or oven.
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Old 01-26-2020, 12:53 AM   #46
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Find another electrician, real fast. Make certain that they understand the specs and wiring for RV receptacles. They are NOT 50 amp 220 volts like your home dryer or oven.
Actually, 50 AMP RV service is EXACTLY like your home 240 VAC appliance service.
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Old 01-26-2020, 01:25 AM   #47
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Don't get caught up in all the fancy terminology. It's basically two 120V supply lines installed separately at the outlet and operate independently of each other. See photo. This should be basic 101 for any electrician. I've heard the horror stories of this type "electrician" wiring a 50A service pole but does it just as if he were wiring it for a 220/240 dryer or such. The minute you plug into it...you blow your entire electrical system out. If he can read, show him this picture. It requires a 6/3 with ground cable...4 wires total.

Right. My son had an idiot electrician do it wrong. Took a year to recover his trailer.
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Old 01-26-2020, 02:36 AM   #48
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Find another electrician, real fast. Make certain that they understand the specs and wiring for RV receptacles. They are NOT 50 amp 220 volts like your home dryer or oven.
WRONG!!! They are exactly like your home oven. 50 amp 240 volts 4 wire!! Exactly like your home 220 went the way of the pay phone years ago. In the modern world is called 120/240. If you don't believe me, put a volt meter accross the 2 hot legs and come back and tell me what you found!
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Old 01-26-2020, 02:37 AM   #49
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I have a ‘basic’ working knowledge of electricity, and it gets me through my projects. Every time one of these questions comes up, I follow with hopes of improving my capabilities. But mostly, these posts get too technical and serve only to confuse me. To answer the Ops question, in my basic way, the 50 amps can be either 110 or 220, depending on the breaker, the panel, and how the electrician wired it. It can be either, so “what voltage is 50 amps” is not a valid question. For those that disagree, most of the on board generators built into the RV are 50 amp, 110 volt; and YES it will run 2 AC’s plus other appliances. Again, basics.
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Old 01-26-2020, 02:57 AM   #50
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Yes it is 220 volts, don’t be confused by people not familiar with wiring, if people think you can run two ACs and other 110 volt items on 50 Amps of 110 , then they delusional. Your electrician is correct.

JohnK
You are (Unknowingly) the delusional one here. 13.5 a/c = 14 x's 2 = 28 amps. Microwave 10.4 28 + 10.4 =30.4. toaster = 10 amps. Add that and we are at 40.5. See where I'm going? I don't see a problem. 50 amp RV service is 2 - 50 amp legs @120 volts each.
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Old 01-26-2020, 03:50 AM   #51
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I have a ‘basic’ working knowledge of electricity, and it gets me through my projects. Every time one of these questions comes up, I follow with hopes of improving my capabilities. But mostly, these posts get too technical and serve only to confuse me. To answer the Ops question, in my basic way, the 50 amps can be either 110 or 220, depending on the breaker, the panel, and how the electrician wired it. It can be either, so “what voltage is 50 amps” is not a valid question. For those that disagree, most of the on board generators built into the RV are 50 amp, 110 volt; and YES it will run 2 AC’s plus other appliances. Again, basics.
We're not talking generators here: which may or may not supply 240 VAC in a 50 Amp coach, but certainly only supply 120 VAC in a 30 Amp coach.

We are talking RV electrical supply service: Which means a 50 Amp coach plugs into a 240 VAC 50 Amp capable receptacle and a 30 Amp coach plugs into an RV specific 120 VAC 30 Amp capable receptacle.
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Old 01-26-2020, 04:06 AM   #52
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The US system is 120/240. 110/220 went the way of the pay phone years ago.
RV 30 amp 120 volts = 3600 watts. RV 50 amp 240 volt = 12,000 watts.

50 amp RV service has 240 volts delivered to the RV via 2 hot 120 volt legs.
Thanks Cavie. Was not familiar with USA having both 110/220 or 120/240 dual voltage systems (2 x 120 hot legs) except in many marina's these days I understand. In the EU on single phase 32A is usually the max on one leg (so 7.6Kw) on a 30ma circuit breaker then it moves to three phase.

The chances of finding a supply at this rating though are slim this side and three phase, likely never. The majority of EU made RVs dont have AC units and most dont have generators but norm is small rigs, no slides, etc. In Southern Europe moving big rigs around in very narrow roads is not fun.

When we ship US built RVs over to the UK we have a lot of conversion to do to meet EU regulations before they can be registered, usually means a total rewire on the AC side, new distribution board, change out TVs, and fridges, etc and of course the socket outlets changed.
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Old 01-26-2020, 04:19 AM   #53
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16, I answered the basic question, which to me was not a valid question. I explained why and simply gave an example why it was not. Works for me.
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Old 01-26-2020, 09:36 AM   #54
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I just find it interesting that people are challenging a member that is a retired master electrician. I would hate to be there physician or surgeon.
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Old 01-26-2020, 09:40 AM   #55
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Thanks Cavie. Was not familiar with USA having both 110/220 or 120/240 dual voltage systems (2 x 120 hot legs) except in many marina's these days I understand. In the EU on single phase 32A is usually the max on one leg (so 7.6Kw) on a 30ma circuit breaker then it moves to three phase.

The chances of finding a supply at this rating though are slim this side and three phase, likely never. The majority of EU made RVs dont have AC units and most dont have generators but norm is small rigs, no slides, etc. In Southern Europe moving big rigs around in very narrow roads is not fun.

When we ship US built RVs over to the UK we have a lot of conversion to do to meet EU regulations before they can be registered, usually means a total rewire on the AC side, new distribution board, change out TVs, and fridges, etc and of course the socket outlets changed.
Don't have two systems. Just one. 120/240. Single phase. 3 phase is used in commercial and industrial systems.
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Old 01-26-2020, 09:48 AM   #56
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I have a ‘basic’ working knowledge of electricity, and it gets me through my projects. Every time one of these questions comes up, I follow with hopes of improving my capabilities. But mostly, these posts get too technical and serve only to confuse me. To answer the Ops question, in my basic way, the 50 amps can be either 110 or 220, depending on the breaker, the panel, and how the electrician wired it. It can be either, so “what voltage is 50 amps” is not a valid question. For those that disagree, most of the on board generators built into the RV are 50 amp, 110 volt; and YES it will run 2 AC’s plus other appliances. Again, basics.
There is no single leg 50 amp 120 volt service. It's 30 amp single leg 120 volt service. OR it's 50 amp 2 legs 240 volt service. That's it. I wish people would stop thinking that RV services are something special out of the twilight zone!
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Old 01-26-2020, 12:39 PM   #57
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I am new to this. I am having a 50 amp plug installed at my house for my ACE 32.1. My electrician thinks it should be 220 volts, but some comments on the forums indicated that it is 110. Help please.


Thanks.
Technically---your electrician is correct! It is a 220 volt plug, but your RV only uses 110 volts at a time, drawing from each 110-volt leg. This allows you to run both A/C's at the same time.
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Old 01-26-2020, 01:13 PM   #58
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I just find it interesting that people are challenging a member that is a retired master electrician. I would hate to be there physician or surgeon.
I agree with you.

I would bet the OP has not even read the comments in this thread, but then neither has any one else.
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Old 01-26-2020, 02:13 PM   #59
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after much experience with RV electrical, I'll add my learned info:

- VOLTS is the power that the Utility sends to the campground, and to the power pedestal where you plug in your RV. It is the same for everyone... and is based on the 120 volt standard power system that you find everywhere.

- AMPS are a byproduct of what you USE while you are in your RV.. and has nothing to do with 120 volts of power. Your individual circuit breakers in your RV are designed to LIMIT your use of power in order not to overheat the wires, such as your 15amp circuit breaker for your outlets, or your 20amp circuit for your roof air conditioner. Your 30amp Main Breaker is your protection for ALL of the power you use ALL at the same time, from your individual breakers.

- if you have a 30amp RV, it is designed with 3 wires - a HOT wire, a NEUTRAL wire, and a GROUND wire. You will have access to 120 volts of power, with a maximum usage of 30amps total from your RV before your camprground's power pedestal's Main Breaker trips. OR your RV's own Main Breaker trips - both provide the same protection.

- if you have a 50amp RV, though, it is a different wire scheme, as it actually accesses 240 volts from the campground. This is not different from your Home, but it IS different from your neighbors in the campground who have a 30amp RV.
This type of service uses FOUR wires - a HOT Leg(black), another HOT leg(red), a NEUTRAL, and a GROUND.
Another difference is the campground pedestal's Main Breaker for this 50amp service - it uses a 'double-pole' breaker set(two individual 50amp breaker tied together with a common handle). This is easily differentiated from the more typical 30amp 'single' breaker.

- the main differences between 30amp RV service and 50amp RV service is the amount of AMPERAGE that the larger service can allow to be used by the RV.
30amps at 120volts is 30amps of usable 120v power.
50amps at 240volts, though, is 100amps of usable 120v power.

Now, electricians will say that this is not technically 'correct' to say that 50amp RV service is actually 100amps of 120v power, but since most every typical 50amp RV only has 120v single breakers within it's Main Panel, the end outcome is that the RV owner has access to using up to 100amps of power.
While a select and very few larger RVs might have a double-pole breaker within their Main Panel to power a 240v clothes dryer, it's not common.
The electrical industry has always assigned 'Amperage' as a language that only pertains to the number on the end of each Breaker, whether that breaker is a single pole 120v or a double-pole 240v type, which creates confusion for the RVing public, since few of us have had 'electrical education', at least in this 'mobile' environment where we have to be aware of 'what' type of outlet we are plugging into.

- yes, the typical 50amp RV does not make use of onboard 240v power, even though that is exactly what is being supplied by the shore power cord, and the campground's power outlet. The RV's main panel accepts these two HOT Legs, but only uses them separately, which is the same as two separate 50amp Main Panels, which is 100amps of usable power.
Rather than looking at 120v power and 240v power as being 'different', look at 240v power as being a simple way to combine the ability to use more power without having to have two separate outlets, and two separate RV main panels.

- sometimes, using an ADAPTER is a simple way to adjust to a different power service versus what your Shore Cord is originally designed for. It adjusts to the differing outlet, and it also makes use of the correct power for your situation.
A 30amp RV using an adapter to plug into a 50amp RV outlet is simply adjusting to making use of only one HOT Leg. The RV's Main 30amp Breaker will provide the protection from overuse, if any.
A 50amp RV using an adapter to plug into a 30amp RV outlet is simply adjusting to sharing the single HOT Leg between BOTH of the RV's HOT Legs, giving it's Main Panel voltage between all the individual breakers. In this situation, it's likely that the campground's own 30amp Main Breaker will trip, if overuse occurs.
The same applies to either type of RV making use of a more normal 'household' outlet. It is simply adjusting to the differing outlet, and has less 'amps' to make use of, though the power(volts) is still the same.


- Now, what is the 'extreme' electrical FEAR that most new RV owners have?
It's probably that they will somehow plug into an outlet that will 'blow up' their RV.
While it's very, very rare, and highly unlikely that an RV will be subject to any issues from any campground, rv park, or home's electrical outlet, the only probable electrical issue would arise from an incorrectly wired 30amp outlet. One that was accidentally wired as a 240v 3-wire type, versus the correct 120v 3-wire type. The 30amp RV could then see their electronics and appliances have real issues, but it's still very doubtful that any 'blowing up' would happen.



While we worry about these electrical differences, and some of us get a little more technical about it than most others care about, it is good to know some basics, especially as it concerns your own type of RV, and what 'electrical' type it is.
Some will differ about which one is 'best', but the actual power that most all of us make use of in a campground or rv park is basically the same - some just have more that they can make use of than others.


Can a park have issues with voltage? sure.
It's more the Utility company that provides the power, though, than anything to do with the park itself.
Sure, some parks are 'old', but that in itself is not a problem. If wires go from the utility to the park's main panel and to your RV's power pedestal, you'll have power, no matter the 'age' of the park.
At peak times, especially summer hot months, it may seem that the park is 'losing' power, or the voltage is not high enough, causing appliances and air conditioners, especially those with compressors, to have issues starting, or running, and can then require more amperage, thereby tripping breakers seemingly too quickly. It CAN happen, but it's really not the regular problem that some portray. I'll never say that it can't be a problem at certain places at certain times and when the park is really 'full', and at capacity, but it's really unlikely, though some will purchase additional 'protection' against these rare occurrences. It's not something most of us will ever have to worry about.

Can a park have an incorrectly wired outlet. I suppose. I've seen it - at least I've experienced a campground in Alaska that had a '3 prong dryer outlet' instead of the correct 3 prong 30amp RV outlet, but I doubt the wiring was actually incorrect. I think the 'brother-in-law' electrician didn't realize that the outlet was different for RVs than for 240v dryers, since the hardware store probably only had the dryer outlets on hand. At that time, I simply used my special 'dual 120v' adapter to provide two connections from two 120v 20amp 'household' outlets, instead.

Could a place have an incorrectly wired 50amp outlet?
Sure, but that one is much less probable since it would be more noticeable by the RV owner that the campground breaker is only a 'single' 50amp breaker, instead of the double-pole type, and the loss of one of the HOT Legs would mean that only 'half' of the RV would have 120v power, if the outlet was even correct in the first place.




enjoy ! : )
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Old 01-26-2020, 02:22 PM   #60
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Good morning, ryno. Anyone can be wrong. I’ll give you another example. There’s a county RV park in Norman, OK where we stay when my wife visits her family. They have a few 50 amp sites and a lot of 30 amp sites. It’s set up so that services are between two sites and it’s never crowded. I have a ‘Y’ cable with two 30 amp, 120 volt, male RV Plugs on the arms and a 50 amp female on the leg. I plug the two 30’s into two separate 30 amp outlets and my RV power cable into the 50 amp female. My inside panel reads 50 amps, and I monitor L1 and L2 on the other panel. I thought that it was 120, but really don’t care. It provides the necessary 50 amps, and works for me. I have similar results with a 50 amp parallel kit and two 3500 watt remote control generators.

And doctors are required to have malpractice insurance; no one is beyond mistakes.
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